This course focuses on the applied analysis of the relationship between economic activity and environmental issues. Computer modelling can help researchers and policymakers better understand the relation between environmental pressures and the economy.

Different types of economic models and modelling techniques will better fit certain problems one wishes to study. This course will cover various techniques such as linear programming, partial equilibrium modelling, input/output modelling, computable general equilibrium modelling and neo-classical growth modelling. Through examples of various environmental problems (e.g. climate change, pesticide, pollution) different approaches will be discussed. In the lectures different theoretical models will be introduced and discussed using academic papers. In the practicals students will build applied models using GAMS.

This course provides students the analytical insights and skills to develop and critically evaluate applied environmental-economic models. The skills developed can be used to apply within their own field of research. Students need no previous knowledge of computer modelling, but will benefit from prior environmental economic knowledge.

Aims of the course

The main aim of the course is to acquaint students with different methodologies of doing applied research in the field of environmental economics. The students will learn to

  • read and understand empirical studies from the literature;
  • analyse and evaluate the theoretical background of applied research methodologies;
  • make their own scenario studies in GAMS;
  • translate environmental-economic problems into mathematical models;
  • do (quantitative) policy analysis in the field of environmental economics;

Activities

  • lectures (10% of time: 6 hours)
  • class discussions (5% of time: 3 hours, discussing a selection of articles)
  • self-study (20% of time: 18 hours)
  • computer practicals (20% of time: 18 hours)
  • case study (50% of time: 30 hours; incl. solving the model using GAMS, writing the paper)

 

Examination

The grade for the course will be determined based on:

  • the case study, including the case study report (70%).
  • the discussion articles in the reader (30%). For each element a pass (a grade of at least 5.5) is required to get a final grade.

Literature

The literature for this course consists of:

  • Reader “Theories and models in environmental economics” (R)
  • Reader “GAMS for environmental-economic modelling” (GR)
  • Case study handouts (H)

The readers and handouts will be distributed during the first meeting.
Schedule

Date

Time

Subject

Literature

Room

27 May

9.00-11.00

Introduction

R (Chapter 1)

S306

 

13.00-16.00

Practical

GR (Chapter 1)

S311

28 May

10.00-12.00

Linear optimisation

R (Chapter 2)

Ub342

 

13.00-16.00

Practical

GR (Chapter 2)

Ub334

29 May

10.00-12.00

Partial Equilibrium

R (Chapter 3)

Ub336

 

13.00-16.00

Practical

GR (Chapter 3)

Ub336

30 May

10.00-12.00

Input-Output

R (Chapter 4)

Ub334

 

13.00-16.00

Practical

GR (Chapter 4)

Ub334

31 May

10.00-12.00

CGE

R (Chapter 5)

S304

 

13.00-16.00

Practical

GR (Chapter 5)

S304

3 June

10.00-12.00

Neo-classical

R (Chapter 6)

Ub336

 

13.00-16.00

Practical

GR (Chapter 6)

Ub336

4 June

10.00-12.00

Questions

S311

 

13.00-16.00

Back up practical

S311

15 July

10.00

Final proposal agreement

1 Sep

10.00

Hand in final paper

Contact

For further questions contact:

Kelly de Bruin

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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