As most anthropologists know, when winter turn into spring, the CERE researchers conduct their yearly ritual in the Swedish mountains, called the Ammarnäs Workshop. The most significant feature of this ritual is that, unlike most gatherings within academia, it manly focuses on the work done by the junior members of the tribe – the so called Ph.D and Post-Doc researchers.


Shanshan Zhang The presentations covered a broad range of issues and techniques, but much of the current research was centered on energy related issues. Looking forward, different issues within behavioral economics were mentioned in presentations concerning upcoming and planned research.

According to one CERE researcher, The Ammarnäs workshop is a useful practice in the sense that the PhD students find the opportunity to work together and get suggestions from the senior researchers and professors. It is also suggested that it is a good practice in anticipation of the summer, the main breeding season of the CERE researcher. In order to avoid inbreeding, the CERE researchers are, during the summer, dispersed throughout the world in order to find appropriate mates for their ideas –but more of this in an upcoming newsletter.

The meeting lasted two days, and after presentations, researchers had the opportunity to do some winter activities and explore the natural site.

Pictures by Göran Bostedt, portraying PhD student Shanshan Zhang and Ammarnäs church. 

Ammarnäs kyrka