Research show that those who adopt renewable energy tends to male and members of an environmental organization. This comes from Lei Shi's thesis, a new doctor at CERE. Her thesis also shows that a large growth in energy consumption leads to a decrease in the share of renewable energy in total energy supply. She also have tip for the environmental organizations constructing their strategy.

Lei Shi with her opponent Mattias Boman Photo Mona Bonta BergmanDecrease in renewable energy

The thesis is composed of four separate papers. In brief, the first paper presents an analysis of the factors that influence the share of renewable energy in the total energy supply, using data from 26 OECD countries. The results indicate that policy measures and research and development (R&D) are important for increasing the share of renewable energy while a large growth in the consumption of energy decreases the share of renewable energy in total energy supply.

Renewable energy can't be expensive

In the second paper, people's willingness to pay for having their electricity supply coming from renewable sources exclusively, is being examined. Six OECD countries are being studied and the results indicate that people are only willing to pay a few percentage points more than their current electricity bill.

Men buy renewable energy

Motivations for adapting renewable electricity among Swedish households are investigated in paper three. The findings indicate that those who adopt renewable energy tend to be males, members of environmental organizations, and people who strongly agree that one should pay for environmental policies.

Help to environmental organizations in need of strategy

Determinants of people's participation in environmental organizations in Sweden are being examined in paper four. A model that accounts for different kinds of non-members is employed, differentiating between non-members who might become members in the future and those who are unlikely to become members, where attitudes and income are found to play an important role.

Lei Shi defended her doctoral thesis titled 'Econometric analyses of renewable energy promotion' on the 25th of April at SLU.